Invalid genera

This chapter deales with several genera, that have once been used to place Goodeid species in. Some of them are still valid, but do not more encompass Goodeids, others have been synonymyzed with other Goodeid genera. The following 12 genera are listed alphabetically and display some information about the history of the genus and the nowadays position of the former included species. A "V" in brackets means that this genus is still valid, but not for Goodeids, and a "NV" means it is not a valid genus, but may be used as a subgenus within another genus.

 

Adinia (V)

This genus has been erected by Girard, 1859. This genus is monotypic today, the only species included is Adinia xenica (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882). Jordan & Evermann placed in 1896 Fundulus dùgesii, now Allotoca dugesii within this genus. Many authors place the genus Adinia nowadays within Fundulus despite of its very different bodyshape.

 

Balsadichthys (NV)

For fishes with similar dentition to Goodea and others, but different ovarian and trophotaenial characters, Hubbs erected in 1926 the genus Balsadichthys. Very soon thereafter, their narrow relationship with Ilyodon had been detected (Hubbs & Turner, 1939), very much because of "fertil hybrids" between Balsadichthys xantusi (Hubbs & Turner, 1939) and Ilyodon furcidens. Nowadays we know that both "species" display different trophic forms of one species. The two in Balsadichthys placed species belong today to Ilyodon: Ilyodon whitei and Ilyodon xantusi, now placed in Ilyodon furcidens.

 

Cyprinodon (V)

This genus has been erected by Baird & Girard in 1853. The both describers placed several killifishes from the dry regions of the southwestern United States within. In 1893, Gilbert described a new subspecies of Cyprinodon macularius: Cyprinodon macularius baileyi. Then in 1932 Hubbs erected the genus Crenichthys for this form, now naming the species Crenichthys baileyi. The genus Cyprinodon is still valid and one of the biggest genera of killifishes in North and Central America, encompassing nearly 50 species, some of them died out already.

 

Cyprinus (V)

Linnaeus erected in 1758 the genus Cyprinus to place our common carp within. Nowadays this genus comprises about 20 species of Eurasian fish. The first known Goodeid had been named Cyprinus viviparus by Bustamante in 1837 and placed within this genus. Today the valid name for this species is Girardinichthys viviparus.  

 

Fundulus (V)

The genus Fundulus has been erected in 1803 by Lacépède. This genus belongs like Adinia to the family Fundulidae and is therefore related with Goodeids. Today this genus encompasses about 40 species living from Canada downwards to Yucatán. Two Goodeid species have been originally described within this genus, both by Bean. The first one had been Fundulus dùgesii, described in 1887 and now called Allotoca dugesii, and the second Fundulus robustus, now placed in Alloophorus. Alloophorus robustus had been placed erronously in Fundulus even a second time by Garman in 1895 as Fundulus parvipinnis, but this had been a wrong identification of a part of the fish he got for identification.

 

Lermichthys (NV)

The genus Lermichthys had been erected by Hubbs in 1926 for a species of Characodon, that showed "no very close affinity with this genus": Characodon multiradiatus. In 1939, Hubbs & Turner pointed at the very close relationship with the genus Girardinichthys, where the species has been placed within later as Girardinichthys multiradiatus.

 

Limnurgus (NV)

Guenther had had obviously a problem with Bleeker (or Girard), otherwise he would have never got the idea to call the by Bleeker (who had never seen the fish) proposed generic name Girardinichthys for a small Mexican fish "barbaric" and ignore it. Out of this reaction, he simply replaced the name Girardinichthys innominatus by Limnurgus variegatus (He even called the specific name barbaric and ignored it!). However, today and despite all turf battles, this species is called correctly Girardinichthys viviparus.

 

Lucania (V)

The genus Lucania comprises today 3 species of Fundulids from the southern USA and Northern Mexico. In 1859, Girard placed the first collected Goodeid in this genus, but didn't describe it (though in the manuscript of his paper the name Lucania richi can be found, but not in the paper itself). The name Lucania richi had been used by Goode in 1891, probably because he found the name in Girards manuscript. However, this Goodeid had been described much earlier (in 1837) by Bustamante and its valid name today is Girardinichthys viviparus.

 

Mollienesia (NV)

Girardinichthys viviparus had been identified wrongly by Gill in 1882. The former genus Mollienesia represents today a subgenus within the Poecilid genus Poecilia.

 

Ollentodon (NV)

Hubbs & Turner described this genus to replace the name Skiffia multipunctata (Meek, 1902). Both authors found differences in the teeth to take the species out of Skiffia. Maybe because they compared adult Ollentodon multipunctatum with Meeks (young) type specimens of Skiffia lermae respectively variegata (a synonyme of lermae), it might happen that they did not find accordances. Today it is called again Skiffia multipunctata.

 

Platypoecilus (NV)

Guenther erected in 1866 the genus Platypoecilus, that comprised till the begin of the next century a handful of described species. Except Platypoecilus quitzeoensis, described by Bean in 1898, all others had been Poecilid species. In 1902, Meek placed this one species in the genus Zoogoneticus and named it Zoogoneticus quitzeoensis. Most of the members of the former genus belong to the Poeciliid genus Xiphophorus today, comprising fishes of the Platy-type.

Xenendum (NV)

Due to the erroneous original description of the teeth of Goodea as being tricuspid, Jordan & Snyder described in 1900 the fish with bicuspid teeth in a new genus as Xenendum caliente. At the same time, they described two additional species: Xenendum luitpoldi and Xenendum xaliscone. In 1901, Pellegrin added the species Xenendum multipunctatum. Already in 1902, Meek found out, that Xenendum caliente was belonging to Goodea atripinnis, and placed the other both species in the same genus as Goodea luitpoldi and Goodea xaliscone, whereas he placed Xenendum multipunctatum in the genus Skiffia and called it Skiffia multipunctata. Goodea luitpoldi and xaliscone are treated today as synonyms of Goodea atripinnis, at least as long as its phylogeny isn't cleared yet.  

mmmchapter deales with several genera that have been used to place Goodeid species in. Some of them are still valid, but do not more encompass Goodeids, others have been synonymyzed with other Goodeid genera. The following 12 genera are listed alphabetically and display some information about the history of the genus and the nowadays position of the former included species. A "V" in brackets means that this genus is still valid, but not for Goodeids, and a "NV" means it is not a valid genus, but may be used as a subgenus within another genus.
 
Adinia (V)
This genus has been erected by Girard, 1859. This genus is monotypic today, the only species included is Adinia xenica (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882). Jordan & Evermann placed in 1896 Fundulus dùgesii, now Allotoca dugesii within this genus.
 
Balsadichthys (NV)
For fishes with similar dentition to Goodea and others, but different ovarian and trophotaenial characters, Hubbs erected in 1926 the genus Balsadichthys. Very soon thereafter, their narrow relationship with Ilyodon has been detected (Hubbs & Turner, 1939), very much because of "fertil hybrids" between Balsadichthys xantusi (Hubbs & Turner, 1939) and Ilyodon furcidens. Nowadays we know that both "species" display different trophic forms of one species. The two in Balsadichthys placed species belong today to Ilyodon: Ilyodon whitei and Ilyodon xantusi, now even placed in Ilyodon furcidens.
 
Cyprinodon (V)
This genus has been erected by Baird & Girard in 1853. The both describers placed several killifishes from the dry regions of the southwestern United States within. In 1893, Gilbert described a new subspecies ofCyprinodon macularius: Cyprinodon macularius baileyi. Then in 1932 Hubbs erected the genus Crenichthys for this form, now naming the species Crenichthys baileyi. The genus Cyprinodon is still valid and one of the biggest genera of killifishes in North and Central America, encompassing nearly 50 species, some of them died out already.
 
Cyprinus (V)
Linnaeus erected in 1758 the genus Cyprinus to place our common carp within. Nowadays this genus comprises about 20 species of Eurasian fish. The first known Goodeid had been named Cyprinus viviparus by Bustamante in 1837 and placed within this genus. Today the valid name for this species is Girardinichthys viviparus.  
 
Fundulus (V)
The genus Fundulus has been erected in 1803 by Lacépède. This genus belongs like Adinia to the familyFundulidae and is therefore related with Goodeids. Today this genus encompasses about 40 species living from Canada downwards to Yucatán. Two Goodeid species have been originally described within this genus, both by Bean. The first one had been Fundulus dùgesii, described in 1887 and now called Allotoca dugesii, and the second Fundulus robustus, know placed in Alloophorus. Alloophorus robustus had been placed erronously in Fundulus even a second time by Garman in 1895 as Fundulus parvipinnis, but this had been a wrong identification of a part of the fish he got for identification.
 
Lermichthys (NV)
The genus Lermichthys had been erected by Hubbs in 1926 for a species of Characodon, that showed "no very close affinity with this genus": Characodon multiradiatus. In 1939, Hubbs & Turner pointed at the very close relationship with the genus Girardinichthys, where the species has been placed within later as Girardinichthys multiradiatus.
 
Limnurgus (NV)
Günther had had obviously a problem with Bleeker, otherwise would he have never gotten the idea to call the by Bleeker (who had never seen the fish) proposed generic name Girardinichthys for a small Mexican fish barbaric and ignore it. Out of this reaction, he replaced the name Girardinichthys innominatus by Limnurgus variegatus (He even called the specific name barbaric and ignored it!). However, today and despite all turf battles, this species is called correctly Girardinichthys viviparus.
Lucania (V)
The genus Lucania comprises today 3 species of Fundulids from the southern USA and Northern Mexico. In 1859, Girard placed the first collected Goodeid in this genus, but didn't describe it (though in the manuscript of his paper the name Lucania richi can be found, but not in the paper itself). The name Lucania richi had been used by Goode in 1891, probably because he found the name in Girards manuscript. However, this Goodeid had been described much earlier (in 1837) by Bustamante and its valid name today is Girardinichthys viviparus.
Mollienesia (NV)
Girardinichthys viviparus had been identified wrongly by Gill in 1882. The former genus Mollienesia represents today a subgenus within the Poecilid genus Poecilia.
Ollentodon (NV)
Hubbs & Turner described this genus to replace the name Skiffia multipunctata (Meek, 1902). Both authors found differences in the teeth to take the species out of Skiffia. Maybe because they compared adult Ollentodon multipunctatum with Meeks (young) type specimens of Skiffia lermae respectively variegata (a synonyme of lermae), it might happen that they did not find accordances. Today it is called again Skiffia multipunctata.
 
to be continued
Platypoecilus (NV)
Xenendum (NV)This chapter deales with several genera that have been used to place Goodeid species in. Some of them are still valid, but do not more encompass Goodeids, others have been synonymyzed with other Goodeid genera. The following 12 genera are listed alphabetically and display some information about the history of the genus and the nowadays position of the former included species. A "V" in brackets means that this genus is still valid, but not for Goodeids, and a "NV" means it is not a valid genus, but may be used as a subgenus within another genus.
 
Adinia (V)
This genus has been erected by Girard, 1859. This genus is monotypic today, the only species included is Adinia xenica (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882). Jordan & Evermann placed in 1896 Fundulus dùgesii, now Allotoca dugesii within this genus.
 
Balsadichthys (NV)
For fishes with similar dentition to Goodea and others, but different ovarian and trophotaenial characters, Hubbs erected in 1926 the genus Balsadichthys. Very soon thereafter, their narrow relationship with Ilyodon has been detected (Hubbs & Turner, 1939), very much because of "fertil hybrids" between Balsadichthys xantusi (Hubbs & Turner, 1939) and Ilyodon furcidens. Nowadays we know that both "species" display different trophic forms of one species. The two in Balsadichthys placed species belong today to Ilyodon: Ilyodon whitei and Ilyodon xantusi, now even placed in Ilyodon furcidens.
 
Cyprinodon (V)
This genus has been erected by Baird & Girard in 1853. The both describers placed several killifishes from the dry regions of the southwestern United States within. In 1893, Gilbert described a new subspecies ofCyprinodon macularius: Cyprinodon macularius baileyi. Then in 1932 Hubbs erected the genus Crenichthys for this form, now naming the species Crenichthys baileyi. The genus Cyprinodon is still valid and one of the biggest genera of killifishes in North and Central America, encompassing nearly 50 species, some of them died out already.
 
Cyprinus (V)
Linnaeus erected in 1758 the genus Cyprinus to place our common carp within. Nowadays this genus comprises about 20 species of Eurasian fish. The first known Goodeid had been named Cyprinus viviparus by Bustamante in 1837 and placed within this genus. Today the valid name for this species is Girardinichthys viviparus.  
 
Fundulus (V)
The genus Fundulus has been erected in 1803 by Lacépède. This genus belongs like Adinia to the familyFundulidae and is therefore related with Goodeids. Today this genus encompasses about 40 species living from Canada downwards to Yucatán. Two Goodeid species have been originally described within this genus, both by Bean. The first one had been Fundulus dùgesii, described in 1887 and now called Allotoca dugesii, and the second Fundulus robustus, know placed in Alloophorus. Alloophorus robustus had been placed erronously in Fundulus even a second time by Garman in 1895 as Fundulus parvipinnis, but this had been a wrong identification of a part of the fish he got for identification.
 
Lermichthys (NV)
The genus Lermichthys had been erected by Hubbs in 1926 for a species of Characodon, that showed "no very close affinity with this genus": Characodon multiradiatus. In 1939, Hubbs & Turner pointed at the very close relationship with the genus Girardinichthys, where the species has been placed within later as Girardinichthys multiradiatus.
 
Limnurgus (NV)
Günther had had obviously a problem with Bleeker, otherwise would he have never gotten the idea to call the by Bleeker (who had never seen the fish) proposed generic name Girardinichthys for a small Mexican fish barbaric and ignore it. Out of this reaction, he replaced the name Girardinichthys innominatus by Limnurgus variegatus (He even called the specific name barbaric and ignored it!). However, today and despite all turf battles, this species is called correctly Girardinichthys viviparus.
Lucania (V)
The genus Lucania comprises today 3 species of Fundulids from the southern USA and Northern Mexico. In 1859, Girard placed the first collected Goodeid in this genus, but didn't describe it (though in the manuscript of his paper the name Lucania richi can be found, but not in the paper itself). The name Lucania richi had been used by Goode in 1891, probably because he found the name in Girards manuscript. However, this Goodeid had been described much earlier (in 1837) by Bustamante and its valid name today is Girardinichthys viviparus.
Mollienesia (NV)
Girardinichthys viviparus had been identified wrongly by Gill in 1882. The former genus Mollienesia represents today a subgenus within the Poecilid genus Poecilia.
Ollentodon (NV)
Hubbs & Turner described this genus to replace the name Skiffia multipunctata (Meek, 1902). Both authors found differences in the teeth to take the species out of Skiffia. Maybe because they compared adult Ollentodon multipunctatum with Meeks (young) type specimens of Skiffia lermae respectively variegata (a synonyme of lermae), it might happen that they did not find accordances. Today it is called again Skiffia multipunctata.
 
to be continued
Platypoecilus (NV)
Xenendum (NV)This chapter deales with several genera that have been used to place Goodeid species in. Some of them are still valid, but do not more encompass Goodeids, others have been synonymyzed with other Goodeid genera. The following 12 genera are listed alphabetically and display some information about the history of the genus and the nowadays position of the former included species. A "V" in brackets means that this genus is still valid, but not for Goodeids, and a "NV" means it is not a valid genus, but may be used as a subgenus within another genus.
 
Adinia (V)
This genus has been erected by Girard, 1859. This genus is monotypic today, the only species included is Adinia xenica (Jordan & Gilbert, 1882). Jordan & Evermann placed in 1896 Fundulus dùgesii, now Allotoca dugesii within this genus.
 
Balsadichthys (NV)
For fishes with similar dentition to Goodea and others, but different ovarian and trophotaenial characters, Hubbs erected in 1926 the genus Balsadichthys. Very soon thereafter, their narrow relationship with Ilyodon has been detected (Hubbs & Turner, 1939), very much because of "fertil hybrids" between Balsadichthys xantusi (Hubbs & Turner, 1939) and Ilyodon furcidens. Nowadays we know that both "species" display different trophic forms of one species. The two in Balsadichthys placed species belong today to Ilyodon: Ilyodon whitei and Ilyodon xantusi, now even placed in Ilyodon furcidens.
 
Cyprinodon (V)
This genus has been erected by Baird & Girard in 1853. The both describers placed several killifishes from the dry regions of the southwestern United States within. In 1893, Gilbert described a new subspecies ofCyprinodon macularius: Cyprinodon macularius baileyi. Then in 1932 Hubbs erected the genus Crenichthys for this form, now naming the species Crenichthys baileyi. The genus Cyprinodon is still valid and one of the biggest genera of killifishes in North and Central America, encompassing nearly 50 species, some of them died out already.
 
Cyprinus (V)
Linnaeus erected in 1758 the genus Cyprinus to place our common carp within. Nowadays this genus comprises about 20 species of Eurasian fish. The first known Goodeid had been named Cyprinus viviparus by Bustamante in 1837 and placed within this genus. Today the valid name for this species is Girardinichthys viviparus.  
 
Fundulus (V)
The genus Fundulus has been erected in 1803 by Lacépède. This genus belongs like Adinia to the familyFundulidae and is therefore related with Goodeids. Today this genus encompasses about 40 species living from Canada downwards to Yucatán. Two Goodeid species have been originally described within this genus, both by Bean. The first one had been Fundulus dùgesii, described in 1887 and now called Allotoca dugesii, and the second Fundulus robustus, know placed in Alloophorus. Alloophorus robustus had been placed erronously in Fundulus even a second time by Garman in 1895 as Fundulus parvipinnis, but this had been a wrong identification of a part of the fish he got for identification.
 
Lermichthys (NV)
The genus Lermichthys had been erected by Hubbs in 1926 for a species of Characodon, that showed "no very close affinity with this genus": Characodon multiradiatus. In 1939, Hubbs & Turner pointed at the very close relationship with the genus Girardinichthys, where the species has been placed within later as Girardinichthys multiradiatus.
 
Limnurgus (NV)
Günther had had obviously a problem with Bleeker, otherwise would he have never gotten the idea to call the by Bleeker (who had never seen the fish) proposed generic name Girardinichthys for a small Mexican fish barbaric and ignore it. Out of this reaction, he replaced the name Girardinichthys innominatus by Limnurgus variegatus (He even called the specific name barbaric and ignored it!). However, today and despite all turf battles, this species is called correctly Girardinichthys viviparus.
Lucania (V)
The genus Lucania comprises today 3 species of Fundulids from the southern USA and Northern Mexico. In 1859, Girard placed the first collected Goodeid in this genus, but didn't describe it (though in the manuscript of his paper the name Lucania richi can be found, but not in the paper itself). The name Lucania richi had been used by Goode in 1891, probably because he found the name in Girards manuscript. However, this Goodeid had been described much earlier (in 1837) by Bustamante and its valid name today is Girardinichthys viviparus.
Mollienesia (NV)
Girardinichthys viviparus had been identified wrongly by Gill in 1882. The former genus Mollienesia represents today a subgenus within the Poecilid genus Poecilia.
Ollentodon (NV)
Hubbs & Turner described this genus to replace the name Skiffia multipunctata (Meek, 1902). Both authors found differences in the teeth to take the species out of Skiffia. Maybe because they compared adult Ollentodon multipunctatum with Meeks (young) type specimens of Skiffia lermae respectively variegata (a synonyme of lermae), it might happen that they did not find accordances. Today it is called again Skiffia multipunctata.
 
to be continued
Platypoecilus (NV)
Xenendum (NV)