Goodea atripinnis

Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Goodea atripinnis
Original Description: 

  JORDAN, D. S. (1880): Notes on a collection of fishes obtained in the streams of Guanajuato and in Chapala Lake, Mexico, by Prof. A. Duges. Proceedings of the United States National Museum 2, for 1879: pp 298 - 301

Etymology: 

  The species name is derived from the Latin and means "black fins". This name refers to the unpaired black find in the female gender. 

Holotype: 

   The whole collection has got the Collection-number: United States National Museum, Cat. No. USNM-23137. The fish have been obtained by A. Dugès and forwarded to the Smithsonian institute.  There is no Holotype deposited.

English Name: 
Blackfin Goodea
Mexican Name: 
Tiro
Synonyms: 

Goodea sp.   Bean, 1880

Characodon atripinnis   Bean, 1888

Characodon variatus   Woolman, 1894 (misidentification)

Characodon luitpoldi   von Bayern, 1894

Xenendum caliente   Jordan & Snyder, 1900

Xenendum xaliscone   Jordan & Snyder, 1900

Xenendum luitpoldi   Jordan & Evermann, 1900

Goodea caliente   Meek, 1902

Goodea luitpoldi   Meek, 1902

Goodea calientis   Regan, 1907

Goodea atripinnis atripinnis   de Buen, 1947

Goodea atripinnis martini   de Buen, 1947

Goodea atripinnis luitpoldii   de Buen, 1947

Goodea atripinnis subsp.   de Buen, 1947

Goodea atripinnis xaliscone   de Buen, 1947

 

Karyotype: 

  The Karyotype describes the number and appearance of chromosomes during the phase of condensation, classified by the position of the centromere (Levan et al., 1964).

The following abbreviations are employed:

 

M = large metacentric chromsome (a result of Robertsonian fusion)

m = small metacentric chromsome (centromere at medium position)

sm = submetacentric chromsome (centromere at submedian position)

smst = submetacentric-subtelocentric chromosome (continous series)

st = subtelocentric chromosome (centromere at subterminal region)

stt = subtelocentric-acrocentric chromosome (continous series)

t = acrocentric chromosome (centromere at terminal region)

 

The Karyotype of Goodea atripinnis, following Uyeno, Miller & Fitzsimons, 1983:

2n = 48    2sm/ 46stt  

Size: 
The maximum known SL is about 200mm.
Terra typica: 

  The types have been collected near the town of León in the state of Guanajuato. Bean, also in 1880, mentioned this species, and also specimens collected by Dugès, with the locality given as a salt lake in the middle of a little volcanic plain in Valle de Santiago, Guanajuato. Eventually, these might be the same specimens.

Status after IUCN: 

  Low concern

Status following other sources: 

  Low risk; Comment: some decline since 2000

Distribution and ESU's: 

  This species is widely distributed. It can be found in the ríos Lerma-Grande de Santiago basin on the Pacific Slope, including former Pleistocene parts of this basin like the Río Ameca drainage and the endorheic Lago de Magdalena basin. It can also be found in the ríos Balsas and Armería basins and some independent Pacific tributaries in Nayarit, and immediately adjacent waters in Jalisco and Michoacán.

Habitat: 

  The habitats are very versatile, including lakes, ponds, streams, springs and outflows. It goes down to 1.7m, but prefers usually depths of less than 0.5m. The water may be clear, turbid or muddy and currents are none to sometimes moderatly strong. Different substrates like mud, clay, sand, gravel and rocks occur. The vegetation is rarely sparse, typical are green algae plus Chara, water hyacinths, Potamogeton, Lemna and Nasturtium.

 

Rio Grande de Santiago IRio Grande de Santiago II

 

Los Negritos ILos Negritos II

 

Laguna Zacapu ILaguna Zacapu II

 

Laguna Zacapu IIILaguna Zacapu IV

 

Río Teuchitlán IRío Teuchitlán II

 

Río Teuchitlán IIIRío Teuchitlán IV

 

Balneario El Rincón, Río Teuchitlán IBalneario El Rincón, Río Teuchitlán II

 

Manantial en La Estancia de Ayones IManantial en La Estancia de Ayones II

 

Manantial La Luz IManantial La Luz II

 

Manantial La Luz IIIManantial La Luz IV

 

Lago de Chapala ILago de Chapala II

 

Manantial La Mintzita IManantial La Mintzita II

 

Manantial La Mintzita IIIManantial La Mintzita IV

Irrigation channel near Ciudad Hidalgo IIrrigation channel near Ciudad Hidalgo II

Pond near Huingo IPond near Huingo II

Spring in Quencio ISpring in Quencio II

 

 

 

Colouration: 

  Jordan described the colour of fish in spirit as "bluish above, sides nearly plain, with a silvery streak along each series of scales. Vertical fins obscurely marked, each of them chiefly black, especially on the distal half."

  Hieronimus (1995) distinguishes between three different types of colouration: The first type is totally silvery in both sexes without any black fins, the second type greenish-yellow with males with green flanks. The belly may be yellow and females display black unpaired fins when being at ease, whereas the males show yellow fins. The third type displays a strong, dark, lateral band in both sexes with also black unpaired fins in the female gender when feeling comfortable.

  Following him, all three types may be found at one location with different intermediate stages.

Biology: 

  Following Miller, young occur from the end of January to the midth of July, indicating a long reproductive period. On the other hand, Mendoza (1962) found young in Pátzcuaro lake from June to August, indicating just one brood per year for at least this lake. This is a prolific fish; a very large female (149mm SL) contained 167 (!) embryos ready for birth.   These fish generally swim from midwater to bottom, feeding during the day on aufwuchs growing there. It also forms aggregates of stationary fish just off the bottom (Kingston, 1979).

Diet: 

  The gut is elongate (about 230% of the standard length). The mouth is dorsally oriented, the marginal teeth of premaxillary and dentary are arranged in two rows of bicuspid teeth, followed by a set of small unicuspid teeth. This species is definitely herbivorous, feeding mainly on filamentous green algae, water plants, microcrustacea and mollusca. Jordan in his orginial description described the intestinal canal as "considerably convoluted and filled with mud."

Remarks: 

  Jordan wrote in his description in 1880 about the dentition: "both jaws with a series of rather slender, tricuspid teeth". The same D. S. Jordan & J. O. Snyder, 20 years later, collected fish of the same species in the Río Verde with - this time correctly identified- bicuspid teeth. Due to Jordans wrongly given definition of tricuspid teeth in the description of Goodea atripinnis (and in his definition of the genus Goodea), both erected a new genus with bicuspid teeth, Xenendum, and described this species new, Xenendum caliente. Meek in 1902 changed the name of this species in Goodea caliente, synonymized Xenendum with Goodea but did not recognize both species as one.  

 

  Princess Therese von Bayern described in 1894 (with the help of Franz Steindachner) the species Characodon luitpoldi (later named Goodea luitpoldii) from Lago de Pátzcuaro. The differences to atripinnis should be mainly the size (with more scale rows respectively) and constantly smaller scales. Following the scientific literature, luitpoldii should be the Goodea - representative of the bigger lakes (like Chapala, Zacoalcos and Pátzcuaro), whereas atripinnis should inhabit streams and smaller lakes. It is not ultimatively cleared if Goodea luitpoldii is a valid species - as well as gracilis -  but in contrast to this species, it is mostly not treated as valid by most of the authors and scientists, so we decided to place luitpoldii in the synonymy of atripinnis.

 

  In 1900, when Jordan and Snyder erected the genus Xenendum, they described besides the species caliente a second species: Xenendum xaliscone from Lago de Chapala. Already 2 years later, Meek synonymized both species rightly.

 

  At one location can be found different types of colouration, but also in body shape, means long and slender individuals as well as relatively short and high-backed ones. This fact makes it impossible to distinguish any subspecies according to colour patterns or body shapes.

 

  In 1924 described C. Hubbs the species Goodea captiva after some specimens from Jesus Maria, bottled together with specimens of atripinnis and thought to belong to this species. Though he thought that both species are closely related, in 1937, together with C. L. Turner, he transfered this species into a new genus: Xenoophorus. Some authors believe, that within the Chapalichthyini, the closest relative of Goodea can be found within the genus Xenoophorus.

 

  In 1947 Fernando de Buen downgraded all described species to subspecies label and described a new one from the Río Grande de Morelia: Goodea atripinnis martini. This population resembles more the atripinnis-type than the luitpoldii-type and is placed within the synonymy of atripinnis meanwhile.

 

  In 2010, few specimens of the genus Goodea have been found in the Río Metztitlán in the state of Hidalgo, that waters into the Lago Metztitlán. Comparing measures from these five individuals show intermediate results between the two accepted species gracilis and atripinnis, so the final position of this population isn't sure at all. However, following distribution patterns, it should rather belong to Goodea gracilis and is together with the population of Girardinichthys viviparus from the Lago Tecocomulco one of the most eastern distributed populations of Goodeids.

 

  In contrast to all other Goodeids, Goodea atripinnis is high tolerant of highly degraded environments and has got a big range of distribution, the absolutely biggest among Goodeids with respect to the other species. It can be found from tributaries of the ríos Ayuquila and Armería in the west until Mexico City meanwhile (introduced) in the east. It can be found in waters of Durango (introduced) in the north as well as in tributaries of the Río Balsas in the south. The distribution range covers nearly the whole range of all known species of Goodeids in Mexico! 

 

  Goodea atripinnis belongs to few Goodeids used for human consumption. Other sometimes eaten species are Alloophorus robustus and Chapalichthys encaustus.